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The best horror films that are currently being streamed


Is the general writing at this point about something sticky and shameful? Writing words for any purpose feels almost insensitive, and the idea of ​​recruiting editors seems like a gross and selfish abuse of time to me. Do I want to stimulate a healthy distraction or instinctively benefit from paranoia? Do these questions need to be asked or should I skip pretentious self-surveys and continue with my cute little list as if nothing strange is affecting every single one of our lives at the moment?

Hey, we all have to live on despite terror; So I’m forced to ask, “Should we schedule horror classics to stay afloat amidst the insecurity of the disability?” Absolutely. A reasonably frequent check in to the news seems necessary (and impossible to fight), but our days and nights cannot be a matter of pure concern. What we need, in addition to food, water, entertainment, meditation, moderate exercise and occasional nuts, is a film of the greatest variety. My favorite genre and one of my few remaining interests is horror.

I’ve written a few horror movie lists, most of which are important compilations of obscure, scary gems that only appeal to real horror nerds or middle-aged creepers who “saw this on TV in 1986”. I’m gradually becoming these two people and my defense: my goal has always been to get people into the movies that I love.


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I write about horror simply because I love horror; Treasures of the late 60s, 70s and 80s in particular, and I want horror fans to discover or revisit the many films I believe in. Fortunately, we don’t have access to more streaming services than ever before, most of which have a reasonably decent selection of horror.

No matter if you like ghouls, the undead, creepy perverts or creatures, there are currently good films available on Prime, Netflix, Hulu and (very surprisingly) Tubi. I weed through an overwhelming amount of garbage and chose the best horrors so you don’t have to.

Netflix

Netflix has been delving deep into the real crime documentary game lately. It feels like there is a new mini-series every day that features ornate drone shots of a remote little town that lead to an unsolved mystery about a woman being held in a shed. It’s widespread, but not everything they have to offer – Netflix has decent movies if you leaf through them thoroughly. I admit their horror selection is overwhelming, but there are at least a few great ones to see.

Rosemary’s Baby (1968)

Rosemary's Baby (1968)

Synopsis: A young couple moves into an upscale apartment, where they are struck by bizarre neighbors, a mysterious pregnancy and understandable paranoia.

Probably the mother of all strongly atmospheric slow burners, Rosemary’s baby is a widely recognized film that hardly justifies attribution. It is the most beautiful horror “waiting for the end” (probably according to critics), but it is so exciting that it gets sick throughout. We are all quite aware of the climax when you consider that it has been referenced, copied, and parodyed since its release, but the awareness does not make it any less disturbing. Rosemary’s baby is a timeless, hair-raising contemplation that set the atmospheric tone for everything that came after.

The Wicker Man (1973)

The Wicker Man (1973)

Synopsis: A police sergeant is sent to a Scottish island in search of a missing girl. Those in the island village claim that the girl never existed.

The Wicker Man is a cult hit, an incredibly slow journey and a menacing treasure of a film that only gets its justification from a certain number of horror nerds. If you enjoyed the 2019 hit Midsommaryou can thank Robin Hardy The Wicker Man for the premise. For films dealing with occultism, this is the matriarch. It’s a British horror masterpiece in which tempo plays a big role in arousing fear, while the finish is unmatched in its sense of foreboding. The Nicholas Cage remake is the best example of an unintentional comedy, which would be shameful if there weren’t that many laughs. Skip the remake unless you run out of pain relievers and need a weird relief.

The invitation (2015)

The invitation (2015)

Synopsis: A man attends a dinner party organized by his ex-wife, at which the behavior is strange and the tensions are high.

The invitation is a memorable horror thriller that is strange enough to be unsettling, but not tense or inventive enough to be considered a kind of “classic”. As with the other films already mentioned, it is about building in The invitation – a creeping one that leads to a somewhat satisfying but ultimately predictable climax. All in all, it’s a disturbing and engaging watch.

Creep (2014)

Creep (2014)

Synopsis: A naive young director replies to an online ad for a videographer appearance in a remote city that captures the latest news from a dying, strange man.

The remarkable drama of Mark Duplass makes Creep what it is – a surprisingly brilliant found footage chiller controlled by a crazy nut box that puts an extremely uncomfortable comedic role in a terrifying role. Schleich is smarter than brutal and far more powerful than Gore. In fact, it’s mostly tame, but can still get under your skin. Schleich is so uniquely good that you want to watch the sequel, which is equally great in itself (plus more experimental and a little crazier). If a horror after 2000 is impressive enough to push a showy horror head (dork) like myself to see the sequel, it has to be solid.

The witch (2015)

The witch (2015)

Synopsis: Witchcraft and black magic take their toll on a family in New England in the 1630s.

The witch is a calm, visually impressive horror with strong creep factor; a kind of allusion to the pace of the 70s and with a nicer cinematography (not to mention an haunting score). If you like witches, woody horror, folklore or just dark atmosphere, you will enjoy it The witch. Does it deliver its leisurely structure? The individual viewer must decide that. Is it a bit of an ass and maybe overly acclaimed by critics? It is not worth answering or expanding on. Is it worth a watch? Certainly. Would I have more respect for this film if it was exactly what it is but made in the 70’s? Unfortunately yes. Have I lazily asked and answered instead of writing an actual in-depth review?

The Evil Dead (1981)

The Evil Dead (1981)

Synopsis: A group of friends take a trip to a remote hut in the forest, where they accidentally release demons.

Sam Raimi’s low-budget Campy debut demands almost nothing from me. Many horror films have grown to cult status over the years, but The Evil Dead is arguably the ultimate cult classic, and for good reason. It’s the work of a stubborn young filmmaker who wants to prove himself on a very limited budget. Fortunately, the low budget worked in Raimi’s favor. What he created is a bloody, outrageous masterpiece that is incredibly stupid, but gastric and creepy. The evil death is the epitome of a warehouse – an intentionally and masterfully executed warehouse.

Candyman (1992)

Candyman (1992)

Synopsis: A student who researches a mythical monster called “Candyman” unwittingly summons him.

Virginia Madsen plays an endearing, personable lead in this shocking story of urban myth. Two factors distinguish Candyman from other violent horrors of the 90s and earlier: They take place in the “hood”, a general area rarely affected by fictional murderers in scary movies, and we as the audience are forced to really care about the mental role the main character to take care of well-being. The deaths are not nonsensical write-offs for pure entertainment value – they sincerely affect Madsen’s state of mind, leading to horror that is both psychological and entertaining.

The platform (2019)

The platform (2019)

Synopsis: A vertical prison houses inmates who are forced to eat from a platform that feeds prisoners on the highest floors first.

The platform is an overly violent, rather blunt satirical commentary on class that was shot in a very limited environment with keen dialogue and not much else. It’s a dark, brutal, and minimal effort that effectively aims to ward you off and annoy you. You will be thrown a few curves, although this is certainly not a great thinker. The platform is undoubtedly a polarizing journey like any unique film.

Hulu

Of all the streaming services, Hulu probably has the strongest television show. I give them this recognition because their film selection leaves a lot to be desired (although they are at least nicely laid out!)

Children of the Corn (1984)

Children of the Corn (1984)

Synopsis: A young couple moves to a remote town in Nebraskan where a religious children’s cult believes that everyone over 18 must die.

Except for the hilarious climax of the 80s, Children of the corn stops phenomenal and remains able to give the audience the creep. Few films “arrive better in an eerie, abandoned city,” and the feeling of the early 80s actually exists Children of the corn an advantage in this sense. Despite its shortcomings, the film is dark and effectively exciting. It shows one of perhaps the most terrifying opening sequences in the film, and although none of the remaining parts correspond to the first few minutes of terror, Children of the corn is a rivet clock.

Courtney Gains shines as Malachai, the red-haired tyrant who comes second to Isaac and manages to be particularly creepy himself. The wrong god-worshiping children are not 1960s Village of the Damned terrifying, but they’re up there as some of the scariest movie kids. Who could argue with murderous Midwest children who promise faith to a false prophet in a cornfield?

The hut in the forest (2011)

The hut in the forest (2011)

Synopsis: Five friends hike to a woody hut, and the dark secret behind it is released.

An unsung outstanding horror comedy from this point of view that it is not Creepy movie absurdist, although his confident meta approach brings very real laughter between fears. The hut in the forest delivers an unexpected last 30 minutes of exciting horror that makes up for minor setbacks, a certain improbability among our leads, although director Drew Goddard clearly planned this to commemorate the endless supply of useless 80s horror movie teenagers who have no other purpose meet the die. Cottage in the forest is thoroughly inventive – it’s smart enough for non-horror lovers who just want a unique and exciting movie, but it’s also bloody and outrageous enough for the most avid horror fans craving gore and darkness. Be warned though, the curves here are borderline. Yes, the highlight is exciting, but almost too inspired for your own good.

The Descent (2006)

The Descent (2006)

Synopsis: A cave expedition goes wrong when the group it explores is caught and chased by creepy predators.

Through passionate appearances of the purely female cast and a lasting feeling of fear, The descent proves to be a worthwhile claustrophobic film, which is partly a psychological thriller and partly a creature feature. What he lacks is a really dark mood, since he is too dependent on shock and fear of jumping, but The descent is strong in what it does right.

28 days later (2003)

28 days later (2003)

Synopsis: An incurable virus spreads across the UK, leaving the few survivors in search of security.

Sure, it may be a little too close to home right now, but the weirdness of our current social condition makes it out 28 days later a particularly uncomfortable (and fitting) watch. It is all it has to be – crude, threatening and cruel. Some ideas are not fully explored, and the final act fails easily, however 28 days later is a successful hellish pandemic that has had an impact on almost every dystopian streak that came after.

Tubi

Tubi was a shock to me. It’s a completely free streaming service, and so it looks. At first glance, it looks like the DVD rack of the 2007 CVS registry is a streaming platform. You have every C-horror and sophomoric comedy from the early 2000s that you never knew existed. However, if you really invest some time in the search, you will hit gold. Tubi’s horror options are impressive and extensive. I’ll save you time combing through. Here is a very long list of horror sizes on Tubi.

Carnival of souls (1962)

Carnival of souls (1962)

Synopsis: After a tragic car accident, a woman takes a job as a church organist and feels drawn to an abandoned carnival.

Forgive the enthusiasm with which I write Carnival of souls, but it’s one of my top 3 horror films of all time. It’s a rare case that a film from the 1960s hasn’t aged a bit – in fact, the lack of color adds to the scaryness. Carnival of souls is pleasantly slow and extraordinarily strange, and for good reason. As a viewer, you have to ask yourself what exactly is going on: is this young woman crazy or are everyone around her unaware? And why is everyone she meets so distant and strange? It’s annoying even in its boring moments, and very few horrors are required to make this gem a terrible experience. With that said, the fears themselves are those for the record book. You will not be able to shake the unearthly images forever Carnival of souls;; The highlight in particular is a visually great hell.

Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Night of the Living Dead (1968)

Synopsis: A group of Pennsylvaniaers seek shelter in a farmhouse, while carnivorous undead devastate the east coast.

What needs to be checked here? Night of the Living Dead changed the horror genre and played a prominent role in promoting the zombie subgenre. It introduced us to George Romero, one of the best horror filmmakers ever. It led to sequels, remakes, parodies and imitations. Night of the Living Dead cannot generally be considered the best zombie film ever (Romero’s Dawn of the dead usually takes this title,) but it is without question the most important.

Return of the Living Dead (1985)

Return of the Living Dead (1985)

Synopsis: 2 employees in a warehouse for medical care release a gas that raises the dead.

I’m forced to name a horror that is more fun than Return of the living dead. Its most notable aspect is the overarching concept it introduced – zombies eat the brain. In front Return of the living deadNo film had directly assumed that the undead feed on the brain. It’s a damned good track. Very rarely do we get a film with real horror, humor, sensitive characters, constant excitement, effective blood, brilliant effects AND longer nude shots. It’s also as punk as a movie can be.

The Crazy (1973)

The Crazy (1973)

Synopsis: The military struggle to contain an insane virus that is overtaking a small town in Pennsylvania.

The crazy ones is not Romero’s best, but it is intelligently written with a strong message and overwhelmingly grim. There is no hope in this film and you have to respect a horror that offers absolutely no positive takeaways. In addition, it is revised and steeped in the perfect craziness of the 70s, which gives it a borderline documentary feel.

Hell of the Living Dead (1980)

Hell of the Living Dead (1980)

Synopsis: A reporter and her cameraman friend join a 4-man commando unit in the New Guinea jungle while fighting hordes of zombies.

It’s not Lucio Fulci’s work, however Hell of the living dead is Italian zombie madness right up to the end of the 70s. As with most Italian horrors of the 70s and 80s Hell of the living dead brings about 4 alternative titles, including Zombie Creeping Flesh, but Hell of the living dead grabs the hardest blow. It’s exactly what you’d expect from an Italian horror from 1980 – beautiful cinematography, little to no action, senseless nudity, stupid dialogue, and a lot of blood. If you’re a die-hard zombie lover or just a grotesque cheese fan, it’s worth a watch; at least an ironic view.

Creepshow 2 (1987) (The Raft story only)

Creepshow 2 (1987)

Synopsis: A (mostly) terrifying 3-story horror anthology.

This is a unique shot as I do not recommend the entire film. Creep Show 2 is a mess compared to the first one, but how could an anthology think of a candle as a film written by Stephen King directed by George Romero and with effects by Tom Savini? What Creep Show 2 It is a segment called “The Raft” which, by some standards, is as good as if it were not better than all the stories in the original Creep show.

The Gate (1986)

The Gate (1986)

Synopsis: A group of children who are alone at home unleashes a multitude of demons from a hole in their back yard.

Ah, The gate, an unabashedly high-spirited fantasy horror that has the necessary amount of stock and heart to make it a joyful, slightly scary watch. You won’t experience hair-raising moments, but you will be exposed to some great effects for the time, uniquely carefree darkness and some great children’s actors. What The Gate does well is telling an imaginative story about children, in which the children are complex, funny, and refreshingly annoying.

The Exorcist III (1990)

The Exorcist III (1990)

Synopsis: A police lieutenant interviews patients in a psychiatric ward to uncover details of a series of brutal murders.

It is no The exorcist, but nothing is, and worlds are better than the cruel ones Exorcist II: The Heretic. William Blattys The exorcist III doesn’t get anywhere near the amount of credit it deserves. It is a powerful paranormal chiller with outstanding performances by George C. Scott, Ed Flanders and Brad Dourif. Not to mention at least one of the most shocking and unforgettable moments in horror history. Don’t write this off as a crappy third installment.

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)

The Texas Chainsaw Massacre (1974)

Synopsis: Siblings and their friends on the way to their grandfather’s grave in Texas fall victim to a group of cannibalistic psychos.

Tobe Hooper also changed the name of the horror game The Texas Chainsaw Massacre. Many remember that it’s more violent than it actually is, and that’s just proof of how effective a film’s mood can be. The film looks grainy and grotesque – and that’s it – but it’s not overly bloody. It’s the grainy appearance, rawness, and lack of subtlety that Hooper brings with it The Texas Chainsaw Massacre already laid the foundation stone in 1974.

Sleepaway Camp (1983)

Sleepaway Camp (1983)

Synopsis: A shy young girl goes to a summer camp with her cousin, where everyone who is less than good gets his bloody debt.

I’ll shamelessly say it: Sleepaway Camp is one of the best slashers out there, with a lot more atmosphere than is usually attributed. It’s most commonly known for the weirdly absurd twist ending, however Sleepaway Camp differs in several ways from the seemingly endless amount of slashers of the 80s: the kills are original. The tone is an incessant, penetrating gray, and although it is 80s, there is no cheese to be seen. After all, the bizarre psychological distress our lead suffers is wiser than the one we normally get in a slasher. Sleepaway Camp offers a special juxtaposition – a picturesque, remote, seemingly quaint summer camp in which absolutely nothing joyful takes place. A beautiful backdrop that is cast grimly contributes significantly to creating a mood.

Dark Scarecrow Night (1981)

Dark Scarecrow Night (1981)

Synopsis: In a rural town in the south, a man takes revenge on those who murdered him beyond the grave.

This excellently designed rural revenge horror was a television film from the early 80s that makes it all the more remarkable. Dark scarecrow night Leaves much of the terror to your imagination, and it’s creepier for it. A series of solid performances, aptly slow pace, simplicity and an uninviting feeling make this film not only a great TV horror, but a fantastic TV film in general.

Day of the Dead (1985)

Day of the Dead (1985)

Synopsis: A group of scientists and military personnel live in an underground bunker while the world is overtaken by zombies.

Obviously, Tubi is loaded with George A. Romero material, and thank goodness! day of the Dead is not Dawn of the deadthat there is no silliness. It’s undoubtedly darker than its predecessor, and because of this, many might consider this their favorite dead film. day of the Dead suffers from some very bad actors, but the disgusting images, unshakable feeling of hopelessness, and the social commentary in the Romero textbook make up for some fluctuating performances.

Suspiria (1977)

Suspiria (1977)

Synopsis: An American girl attends a renowned ballet academy in Germany, where strange behaviors and violent events make her believe that something uncanny is going on behind the scenes.

We have finally reached Dario Argento; Argento is the best! Suspiria has gained its legal following over the years, so analysis may not be necessary, but I will notice the flawless features: Argento’s cinematography is almost unmatched here. The sets and colors are stunning and clearly Argento. The atmosphere is palpable. The last 20 minutes of the film are nothing short of nightmare material. Suspiria is in the running for 2 titles: the best Italian horror ever and the most atmospheric horror ever.

Haunted Hill House (1959)

Haunted Hill House (1959)

Synopsis: A millionaire is offering $ 10,000 to $ 5 who agrees to spend the night in a creepy mansion.

Save your “That’s out of date” moans – you have to throw House on Haunted Hill on any applicable horror list. We can admit it’s aged to nonsense, but we also have to admit that it’s a delightful playground with fun dialogues, (somehow) scary moments, and Vincent Price’s greatest accomplishment (couldn’t be more arguable.)

Black Christmas (1974)

Black Christmas (1974)

Synopsis: Canadian sisterhood girls are followed by a stranger during the Christmas break.

I apologize and warn you against using “I” in this mini review as this is probably my favorite horror movie ever. I can’t say enough good things about director / pioneer Bob Clark and Black Christmasmainly because this man never gets the proper respect for triggering the slasher genre. John Carpenter’s Halloween is usually referred to as the one who started slasher films, but Bob Clark did it Black Christmas 4 years ago.

Black Christmas is fairly tame, barely graphic, and not very lethal for a film that paved the way for a rush of overly violent films. It has cruel parts and bloody kills, however Black Christmas Shocks more by the indicated darkness and some disturbing noises that will stay with you forever. I won’t run around with any fancy description: Black Christmas is a terrifying film. I know that can’t really be said for many films. We call things “scary” that are not, and always go back to those that really are. Black Christmas is one of the things that sincerely persecute. The writing is so sharp and Clark expresses himself in very funny lines, but that doesn’t stop the whole operation from being unshakably hellish and a greasy kind of darkness in the best possible way. You just feel kind of spoiled after seeing this.

The characters are all profound except those who shouldn’t (though Doug McGrath’s stupid sergeant actually has complexity for him). There are tangible relationship conflicts that cause your real concern. The strangely talented characters deliver well-written sayings with a dry shtick. It’s as compelling dark drama as horror. I hope I still make sense.

Slumber Party Massacre (1982)

Slumber Party Massacre (1982)

Synopsis: An escaped insane person with an exercise crashes during an overnight stay in high school.

Here is another slasher that could easily be drawn into the infinite parade of the horned Friday the 13th Imitations, but it stands out as well done, a little inspired and awesome on the next level. Slumber Party Massacre is a great movie, and I’m not just saying that as a guy with Bacne. Despite the ridiculousness of the title and the youthful premise, director Amy Holden plays it fairly straight forward – almost as if what started as a parody only became an above-average, straightforward slasher with humor. Some visual gags are interspersed here and there, but the project is not cheeky or intentionally stupid. Slumber Party Massacre is a fun, well executed slasher from the mix of so many unforgettable slasher.

Amazon Prime

Despite the most visually cruel and impractical layout of all major streaming services, Amazon Prime is top notch when it comes to choosing films. In particular, their horror list is long and full of gems (although the Shudder add-on gives you access to many more.)

City of the Living Dead (1983)

City of the Living Dead (1983)

Synopsis: A priest’s suicide opens the gates of hell and it falls to a reporter and clairvoyant to close it.

Finally, a few Lucio Fulci! This list would be absolutely ridiculous without the work of the Italian Gore Masters / Maniac itself. City of the Living Dead is part of Fulci’s infamous “Gates of Hell” trilogy and is often outshined by Beyond. It may not be his best (it may be), but it is the Fulci textbook – almost without action, everywhere, poorly synchronized and full of nonsensical dialogues, but excitingly crazy, incredibly crazy and authentically disgusting. City of the Living Dead offers legendary horrible images and concepts that are so disgusting that they have not been seen before. It hasn’t the most structured, complex story, but Fulci does what he wants to do – nausea and scare us off.

The Living Dead at the Manchester Morgue (1975)

The Living Dead at the Manchester Morgue (1975)

Synopsis: A policeman hunts two hippies he suspects are responsible for Manson family murders, like murders the real killer doesn’t know – zombies brought to life by agricultural chemicals.

Let’s make the record clear – The living dead in the Manchester mortuary AKA Leave sleeping corpses lying there is possibly the least appreciated zombie masterpiece in history and one of the best Spanish horrors ever. It’s a minimal, atmospheric zombie story with simple and effective undead. The British landscape creates beauty on the screen, and the resulting hell is a source of real discomfort.

Zombie (1979)

Zombie (1979)

Synopsis: Strangers looking for a woman’s missing father land on a tropical island where a doctor is desperately looking for the cause and cure of a zombie outbreak.

Fulci established himself mad with this Italian version of George Romero Dawn of the dead. As far as I know, this is the only place a zombie can fight a shark, and that’s roughly the extent of what needs to be said.

Coherence (2013)

Kohärenz (2013)

Synopsis: Der Tod eines Kometen führt zu seltsamen Ereignissen während einer Dinnerparty unter alten Freunden.

Kohärenz ist ein effektiver Low-Budget-Science-Fiction-Thriller, in dem der Dialog schwer ist. Es ist meistens ereignislos und perfekt in seiner Abhängigkeit von dem, was Sie nicht sehen. Der Film konzentriert sich auf das Drama zwischen alten Freunden auf einer Dinnerparty und ihre unterschiedliche Paranoia über die unerklärlichen, bizarren Ereignisse im Freien. Es ist ein unvergesslicher außerirdischer Film ohne Schlock oder sogar viel Action. Kohärenz gedeiht in seiner seltsamen Bauweise und der Bedeutung, die es der Instabilität der Charaktere beimisst. Im Grunde ist es ein sehr erfolgreiches Experiment, wie störend ein Alien-Film ohne Budget sein kann. Der Film leidet nur an seiner Schlussfolgerung, die erwartet und überwältigend ist, aber Kohärenz wird dich weit mehr verunsichern, als du denkst.

Deep Red (1976)

Deep Red (1976)

Synopsis: Ein Jazzpianist und ein Journalist sind in den mysteriösen Mord an einem Hellseher verwickelt.

Deep Red ist ein beispielhafter Giallo und ein bestimmendes Werk von Dario Argento. Es ist ein geschickt gedrehter, tief geschichteter Thriller, der anderen Mystery / Slasher-Regisseuren etwas zum Filmen gab. Argento bricht seine charakteristische Schocktaktik und seine fachmännische Kameraarbeit aus, zusätzlich zu einem auffälligen leuchtend roten Blut, das stilistisch versiert ist. Das ist nicht Suspiria-tier für mich, aber für andere ist es eine noch grundlegendere Anstrengung. Vergleiche beiseite, Tiefrot ist ein außergewöhnlich stilvolles frühes Gore-Fest, das Argentos Genie bekannter gemacht hat.

Erblich (2018)

Erblich (2018)

Synopsis: Die Familie Graham, die über den Verlust der Matriarchin Ellen trauert, wird von den Geheimnissen der Abstammung der Familie terrorisiert.

Das wahre Highlight in Erblich ist Toni Colletes Auftritt als Annie, aber auch die dauerhafte Wirkung dieses Films ist erwähnenswert. Es ist eine traurige, visuell störende Fahrt, bei der der Schrecken von Vertrautheit herrührt; genauer gesagt eine deprimierende Realität. Regisseur Ari Aster ist eindeutig von künstlerischen Werken der 70er Jahre inspiriert, da dies ein atmosphärisch angetriebenes, kunstvoll ausgeführtes langsames Brennen ist. Erblich wäre für einen Betrachter bemerkenswerter oder würde zumindest authentischer erscheinen, wenn Sie sich mit der Hexenverrücktheit der 70er Jahre nicht auskennen. Ich nenne es keineswegs Derivat – es ist eine moderne Einstellung, aber es wäre erfreulicher, wenn Sie mit den Filmen, aus denen Ideen stammen, nicht vertraut sind.

Nacht der Dämonen (1988)

Nacht der Dämonen (1988)

Synopsis: Rowdy Teens Party in einem verlassenen Bestattungsinstitut in der Halloween-Nacht, wo die Mächte des Bösen erwachen und sie einzeln abholen.

Nacht der Dämonen ist ungefähr so ​​spät wie ein Film, und eine wilde Uhr deswegen. Diese Horrorkomödie steckt voller Theater-Albernheit und überraschend anständiger Elemente des Horrors sowie hervorragender Make-up-Effekte. Nacht der Dämonen ist slasher-artig mit dem paranormalen Pfeffer. Es ist gruselig, doof, übertrieben grafisch und JA – sehr gehörnt und schmuddelig.

Dead Ringers (1988)

Dead Ringers (1988)

Synopsis: Zwillingsgynäkologen nutzen die Tatsache, dass niemand sie unterscheiden kann.

Einige David Cronenberg waren auf dieser Liste längst überfällig. Tote Ringer Es ist vielleicht nicht Cronenbergs bemerkenswertester Film, aber es ist ein bizarrer Psychothriller mit einem ordentlichen Konzept und hervorragenden Effekten.

Gesellschaft (1992)

Gesellschaft (1992)

Synopsis: Ein Teenager entdeckt, dass seine Familie Teil eines sozialen Elitekults ist.

While society ist ein bisschen konzeptionell offensichtlich und abgeleitet in seinem Angriff auf die wohlhabende Elite. Es ist ein verdrehtes Juwel eines Films, der lange nach dem Anschauen im Hinterkopf bleibt.

Freitag, der 13. (1980)

Freitag, der 13. (1980)

Synopsis: Jugendberater versuchen, ein Sommerlager, in dem Morde stattfanden, wieder zu eröffnen, nur um von einem maskierten Angreifer angesprochen zu werden.

Es ist weder der erste Slasher noch der beste holzige Sommercamp-Slasher (siehe The Burning), aber es ist derjenige, der eine komische Liste von Fortsetzungen und ein Jahrzehnt von Abzockungen inspiriert hat. Freitag der 13 braucht nicht viel mehr Lob oder Analyse, als es im Laufe der Jahre bereits erhalten hat, aber ich sage dies – Es ist effektiv in seinem Ziel, es hat eines der unvergesslichsten Horror-Endungen und es hat dem großen Tom Savini geholfen, seine Arbeit zu erledigen Magie auf viel mehr Filmen.

Pet Sematary (1989)

Pet Sematary (1989)

Synopsis: A father grieving the loss of his young son turns to an ancient burial ground for solutions.

Pet Sematary is one-of-a-kind intriguing for one fact alone: It’s a poorly-acted, overall bad film, but when it’s scary it’s in the legendary section of terrifying. The scenes with Zelda are, for my money, the most haunting moments ever on film. Pet Sematary is in the running for the scariest movie of all time, yet it’s laughably terrible in its entirety. In defense of the acting, Fred Gwynne is terrific as the elderly, sage neighbor Judd Crandall. Dale Midkiff as Louis Creed, on the other hand, is a difficult-to-digest sort of awful. If you can overlook the tv mini-series acting in parts, Pet Sematary is a horror classic and fine Stephen King adaptation in comparison to others.

Shudder Add-On for Prime

I can’t discern whether the extra $5 a month for Shudder is worth it, considering you don’t get quite as many extra movies as you’d expect to, but it does offer some of the very best horrors out there. For example, Shudder has most of John Carpenter’s best works, although Prince of Darkness would be a lovely addition. I’ll simply cite the best horrors on Shudder without synopsis and explanation because the following are only available to those horror lovers who want to spring a little extra money for the add-on (and I’m exhausted.)

  • The Hills Have Eyes (1977)
  • The Fog (1980)
  • Dead and Buried (1981)
  • In The Mouth of Madness (1995)
  • The Changeling (1980)
  • House By The Cemetery (1981)
  • Phantasm (1979)
  • Halloween (1978)
  • The Beyond (1983)
  • Zombie (1979)
  • Re-Animator (1985)
  • Night of the Living Dead (1968)
  • Audition (1999)
  • Black Christmas (1974)
  • The Void (2017)
  • The Babadook (2014)

Topics: Streaming, Netflix, Hulu, Amazon Prime



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